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Thursday, January 28, 2010

Egg Substitution: Flax seed

For most of us, buying powdered eggs isn't a good option for food storage because of how expensive powdered eggs can be. Well, there is a cheaper alternative. Vegans use flax seed as an egg substitute. Flax seed is a healthy alternative, high in fiber, in addition to being less expensive: a 16oz box costs between $3-4. (source and here)

Because of the nutty flavor, flax seed substitution is generally only used in baking: breads, pancakes, waffles, cookies, etc.



Take one tablespoon of milled flax seed. You can either buy it milled, or grind up the kernels in your grinder.


Add 3 tablespoons of water (amount of water may vary per recipe, but this is a pretty basic measurement).



Stir together and then let it sit for a few minutes so it can become gelatinous.



Add to your recipe instead of the eggs. Above cookie recipe is posted on the SGI Test Kitchen here.

Flax seed is like wheat flour in that after it is milled (ground) it needs to be stored in the fridge. So after you open a box of milled flax seed, stick it in your fridge. Actually seeds can be stored in the pantry until ground.

Flax seed can be found in health stores or in your local grocery store by the oat bran and other "hot" cereals.


Have any of you used flax seed before? Maybe in a different use than egg substitution?

22 comments:

germanjules said...

i think that flax seed is a great egg substitute but i think that its shelflife is limited once it has been milled, is it not? so it should be stored in whole flax seed state and then ground? right?

we have egg allergies at our house and we store Ener-G, it has a great shelflife and for $5 it replaces 110 eggs. it is great in baking (except for brownies...the only substitute for that seems to be black or pinto beans-cooked and mashed)

Caroline said...

I have used flaxseed as an egg substitute for awhile and it works great, except in brownies. I got mine by the flour in Wal-Mart. I do use powdered eggs too though.

You can also use milled flaxseed as an oil substitute (3T flaxseed = 1T fat or oil). I haven't tried it yet (that's next on my list of experiments), but I use pureed beans as an oil substitute all the time in baking and it works well (1 part pureed beans = 1 part oil).

Jackie said...

I'm no expert on the subject but I've used soy flour in the past and I seems to work good and is also nutritious but I don't know it's limitations. I bought some packaged soy flour and the conversions are on the label and I don't think it has to be refrigerated. The downside is that I don't think soybeans are the easiest to grind as they gum up the gears.

AllisonK said...

I had no idea. Thanks for the information Abby. I will have to get some if our chickens ever quit producing. Have to thank your family for all our eggs.

Ginger said...

I haven't used flax seed this way, but I've used 1 T. soy flour + 1 T. water as an egg substitute. I'll try the flax idea some time.

roxanne said...

So, is that the amount to replace one egg? It seems like kind of a lot, but maybe it isn't. 1 T flax seed, and 3 T water per 1 egg? I have heard of doing this, but I have never tried it. Thanks for inspiring me!

Sarbear said...

My mother gave me some gelatin as an egg substitute. I've used it in banana bread, corn muffins and cupcakes. It makes it extra moist. 1 tsp to about 5 tbs of water

Heidi said...

Most grain grinders can't grind flax seed due to it's high oil content. It will gum them up.
You can blend them in you blend, food processor, or use a coffee grinder. I bought a cheap coffee grinder and use it exclusively to grind my flax seed.
I like to add flax seed to my bread, pancakes, and muffins as we love the flavor!

Kristine said...

My grinder specifically says not to put flax seeds or anything oily in it. I do have a small coffee grinder that does the job in a couple seconds.

I have never used flax as an egg substitute so I'm excited to try that. I wanted to only use powdered eggs this month just to try them out. I have two different kinds and I had terrible results with both. Yesterday I finally broke down and bought eggs (and had wonderful, fluffy pancakes).

Flax seed also makes a great substitute for oil. Walton feed (www.waltonfeed.com) sells it in bulk at a resonable price.

I would still like to find a good powdered egg that I can have on hand. Any suggestions?

Lynn said...

I agree with the commenters. You should never grind flax in a mill. It will gum it up and ruin it, due to the oils in flax. I use a coffee grinder for that only (I am not a coffee drinker. ; D )

And yes.....flax should be stored in it's whole form. As soon as you grind it, it's shelf life if very short.

Another egg substitute is:

Mix 1 tsp unflavored gelatin, 3 tbsp of cold water, 1/2 cup coiling water. (This equals to one egg.)

For two eggs: 2 tsp gelatin, 1/3 cup cold water and 1/2 cup boiling water.

OR......

Dissolve 1 tsp baking soda in 1 Tbsp vinegar. makes enough for 1 or 2 eggs.

Linda said...

Oh I didn't know that! Thank you! I often wondered what I could use instead of eggs to bake with...

Katie said...

Lynn,
I think your proportions on your egg substitute would add far too much liquid to a recipe. One large egg is about 1/4 cup. Your substitution for 1 egg is about 3 times that.

Alyosha said...

I use whole roasted flax seed in bread and granola. Yum.

CThomas said...

My grandson is allergic to eggs, so I too have used Ener-G with good results. You can just buy it at most grocery stores and it is cheaper than eggs.And I would imagine it would store great.

But it is good to have flax seed stored for the same purpose. It keeps indefinitely in the seed form, but when ground it can give you essential oils needed in your diet. What other oil can you store virtually forever. I just grind it in my blender and store it in the freezer.

Jenn said...

I add ground flax seeds in my gluten free breads and muffins, as well as in my smoothies as well.

Sharron said...

I bought some of this on a lark and had no idea what to do with it. Thanks!

Emilee said...

I use ground flax seed as an egg substitute in rolls and waffles and it works great! It doesn't work well if the eggs are used as leavening (same with powdered eggs). I've also added it to smoothies and meatloaf.

April said...

I have used Flax as a replacement for oil as well...it works great! I have only tried it in waffles and other baked goods.
Also I found that Costco and Sams carry a cold milled flax (that is what you want, otherwise the nutrients are lost) at a pretty good price and it is in a resealable plastic container!

Trina said...

I haven't used flax as an egg substitute but I'll give it a try. It's incredibly good for you so I mix it in yogurt and add it to smoothies. The oils in it are very heat sensitive. That's why you must store ground flax in the fridge or it will go rancid.

Carol said...

I have found unmilled flaxseed at the bread store. (Hostess)

Also if you go to http://shmooedfood.blogspot.com/2005/09/pumpkin-carob-chip-muffins.html for an awesome recipe with flaxseed.

Anonymous said...

I often add ground flax seed to my homemade bread and it does come out nicer - lighter, moister - hard to describe. I grind (in a coffee grinder) just enough to last a couple weeks, and keep it in the refrigerator, along with the whole seeds since oil rich foods tend to go rancid if not refrigerated. I add it to all sorts of baked goods (muffins, cookies, etc.) If you use whole flax seeds, they will have a laxative effect on you since the seeds are rather sturdy little things to digest. Maybe you want that, maybe you don't. Good to be aware of it.

miriam.plass said...
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